INGE!!!!!! OGRUBBER!!!

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INGE!!!!!! OGRUBBER!!!

Postby Kelly » Tue May 12, 2015 6:42 am

Need suggestions.....opinions seem to be wide and varied...

Last year many many many many tomatoes were lost to blight.

Or was it fusillium wilt? Or...

What I do remember hearing last year was it was an air borne fungus that gets into the soil. Correct?

Now question is....how to fix it? If F. wilt then they should be able to add a powder fungicide like holly sulphur to help kill fungus. If Blight...then complete removal of contaminated soil or sterilization of soil?????

Help!!! I'm only giving customers options to try and see rather than the preferred here this will fix you up!

Some days I feel like a soil doctor.......
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Re: INGE!!!!!! OGRUBBER!!!

Postby OGrubber » Tue May 12, 2015 11:37 am

This is extremely complex and I'm not sure I have all the answers.

There are numerous fungal diseases including early blight and late blight and a host of wilts that are hard to differentiate without a lab tissue test. Most are family specific as to host, most drop spores into the soil, most spores travel from area to area via winds where they lay dormant until their specific conditions are met.

In the case of late blight; high humidity or wet conditions and cool temps - as an example, heavy fog in the cool of late summer night will get things moving.
In the case of early blight; high humidity or wet conditions and high heat - for some of us, an average summer.
The ministry recommends spraying fungicides as a preventative measure, weeks before any incidents have occured [based on weather patterns]. What these particular fungicides are, I don't know. But, I'm going to find out what options I have that are acceptable to my certifier. I had lots of losses last year too.

In the mean time,
My advice would be to practise good crop rotation - don't put a tomato back into an area that had tomato or potato or eggplant in it since the fungus settles into the soil and is just waiting for the right conditions. [a three year rotation is considered the minimum]
Practice good hygiene - burn, bury or bag any infected leaves or plants - do not compost. Scout your plants and pinch off any leaves that even look suspect throughout the season.
Give your plants extra space to allow for good air flow and fast drying - no overhead watering, especially in the evenings when the winds have a tendency to become "still". Put a light layer of mulch or newsprint under the canopy of the plants to prevent splash back during a heavy rain.

In my opinion, removal of soil to replace with sterilized soil is merely an expensive stop-gap and creates it's own problems.
I hope some of this has been helpful. ...
market gardening - just another day at the plant
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Re: INGE!!!!!! OGRUBBER!!!

Postby Kelly » Wed May 13, 2015 8:26 pm

Yes it has! Thank you

I have been recommending holly sulphur as a fungicide. So I haven't been far off.

I've used it successfully in the greenhouse....with poor sad hostas, on roses, and Seamus....all of which can be susceptible in the humidity of the greenhouse...affected plants overwintered....just thought it could be used in veggie gardens too.....
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Re: INGE!!!!!! OGRUBBER!!!

Postby Kelly » Wed May 13, 2015 8:28 pm

Sedums....not Seamus. He may be a crusty curmudgeon....but I don't think he has a fungus issue...... :lol:
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